Social work with indigenous communities a human rights approach

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social work with indigenous communities a human rights approach

Social Work with Indigenous Communities: A human rights approach by Linda Briskman

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Published 19.10.2019

Human Rights Approach

In Social Work with Indigenous Communities - A human rights approach, Linda Briskman, social worker, academic and author of the acclaimed book The Black Grapevine - Aboriginal Activism and the Stolen Generations, throws down the gauntlet to practitioners and students of social work, challenging them to pursue a better, more informed way of meeting the unique needs of this community. The realisation of the human rights of Australia's Indigenous population has been marred by recurring and seemingly intractable issues such as poor health and over-representation in child welfare and juvenile justice systems. In this second edition, Briskman adopts a discursive human rights approach which offers the potential to center Indigenous rights and Indigenous voice.
Linda Briskman

Social Work with Indigenous Communities: A Human Rights Approach

The health and welfare of Australia's Indigenous population is marked by recurring and seemingly intractable issues such as poor access to services, family violence, and significant health problems. More than years of historical, cultural and political factors have shaped Indigenous lives - and the perceptions of social workers. Linda Briskman, social worker, academic and author of the acclaimed book The Black Grapevine - Aboriginal Activism and the Stolen Generations, throws down the gauntlet to practitioners and students of social work, challenging them to pursue a better, more informed way of meeting the unique needs of this community. She covers the issues that Indigenous communities face, with specific chapters devoted to the areas of children, youth, family violence, health, and criminal justice. Case studies are supported by literature and research to provide practitioners and students with a good understanding of the circumstances they will be presented with when working with Indigenous communities. Good practice is marked by recognition of the strengths of communities and an understanding of how to acknowledge and facilitate these. This book shows social workers how they can develop their knowledge and skills in this area and how they can excel in their work with Indigenous communities.

In Australia, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples bear a greater burden of disease and have lower life expectancy than their non-Indigenous counterparts. These combined indicators are evidence of an entrenched health crisis in the Indigenous population that is linked to systemic disadvantage over many decades. In an effort to improve life expectancy and lessen the burden of disease, a number of strategies and national frameworks now embed a human rights-based approach to achieving health equality. This paper explores the application of human rights to Indigenous health and examines the inherent tensions that exist in engaging a system of law based on universal assumptions of the Enlightenment to advance Indigenous rights. Indigenous peoples have survived with great resilience in the face of tremendous adversity… they have survived as they have striven to maintain the cultural integrity that makes them different, while adapting, often ingeniously, to the changing conditions around them. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in Australia continue to experience significant health, economic and social disadvantage [ 2 ].

1. Introduction

Social work is laden with contradictions. Despite I good intentions' framed around human rights and social justice tenets, most social work practice remains drawn to individualised constructs. Unless social work grapples more effectively with these tensions, human rights will remain a mere illusion. This chapter examines limitations of social work practice derived from policy and organisational contexts and the emphasis on direct practice. It discusses complexities facing non-Indigenous social workers and Indigenous social workers in mainstream organisations and Indigenous-specific organisations. Leads for practice are provided. The quotation above by early social work reformer Bertha Reynolds is at the heart of social work obligations.

I would like to begin today by acknowledging the traditional owners of the land we meet on today, the Ngunnawal people. Thank you to the Australian Catholic University for inviting me to speak today. As you no doubt know, I am a social worker by training , graduating in , so it is wonderful to have an opportunity to address you. It is great to see so many upcoming social workers here today, as well as a number of you who have a wealth of experience and do so much good in our communities. One that you often do in difficult circumstances, with little support, not to mention little money! Also, thank you to Christine King for her introduction.

Simply link your Qantas Frequent Flyer membership number to your Booktopia account and earn points on eligible orders. Either by signing into your account or linking your membership details before your order is placed. Your points will be added to your account once your order is shipped. Click on the cover image above to read some pages of this book! In Social Work with Indigenous Communities - A human rights approach , Linda Briskman, social worker, academic and author of the acclaimed book The Black Grapevine - Aboriginal Activism and the Stolen Generations , throws down the gauntlet to practitioners and students of social work, challenging them to pursue a better, more informed way of meeting the unique needs of this community. The realisation of the human rights of Australia's Indigenous population has been marred by recurring and seemingly intractable issues such as poor health and over-representation in child welfare and juvenile justice systems. In this second edition, Briskman adopts a discursive human rights approach which offers the potential to center Indigenous rights and Indigenous voice.

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  1. In Social Work with Indigenous Communities - A human rights approach, Linda Briskman, social worker, academic and author of the acclaimed book The Black.

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