Mining capitalism the relationship between corporations and their critics

7.48  ·  1,085 ratings  ·  816 reviews
mining capitalism the relationship between corporations and their critics

Mining Capitalism: The Relationship Between Corporations and Their Critics by Stuart Kirsch

Corporations are among the most powerful institutions of our time, but they are also responsible for a wide range of harmful social and environmental impacts. Consequently, political movements and nongovernmental organizations increasingly contest the risks that corporations pose to people and nature. Mining Capitalism examines the strategies through which corporations manage their relationships with these critics and adversaries. By focusing on the conflict over the Ok Tedi copper and gold mine in Papua New Guinea, Stuart Kirsch tells the story of a slow-moving environmental disaster and the international network of indigenous peoples, advocacy groups, and lawyers that sought to protect local rivers and rain forests. Along the way, he analyzes how corporations promote their interests by manipulating science and invoking the discourses of sustainability and social responsibility. Based on two decades of anthropological research, this book is comparative in scope, showing readers how similar dynamics operate in other industries around the world.
File Name: mining capitalism the relationship between corporations and their critics.zip
Size: 16351 Kb
Published 09.01.2019

Does Capitalism Exploit Workers? - Learn Liberty

International Journal of the Sociology of Language

Oakland: University of California Press, The world history of mining is drama and disaster ridden. This book is about how that story turned into a bitter combination of ecological disaster, legal processes, and what Kirsch terms a failed politics of time and successful politics of space. Mining Capitalism can be read at two levels. First, it is a story of mining disaster and indigenous resistance, which Kirsch follows in multiple places and arenas and of which he has been part 11 , notably including his involvement in the Mines and Communities Network studied in chapter 6 —, n3. Ultimately, taken together the two readings raise interesting questions in terms of interpretation, ethnographic method, and the positioning of contemporary fieldworkers in local and transnational capital contexts. The Ok Tedi story is told in the first half of the book from the indigenous point of view.

CiteScore 1. Stuart Kirsch. Mining capitalism: the relationship between corporations and their critics. Oakland: University of California Press. Language in late capitalism: Pride and profit. London and New York: Routledge.

Mining Capitalism examines the strategies through which corporations manage Mining Capitalism The Relationship between Corporations and Their Critics.
we should all be feminist pdf download

See a Problem?

The corporation is one of the most powerful institutions of our time. But corporations are also responsible for a wide range of harmful effects, including the use of technologies with deleterious consequences for human health and the production of environmental hazards that threaten the planet. These policies have led the state to transfer many of its regulatory responsibilities to corporations and markets.

To browse Academia. Skip to main content. You're using an out-of-date version of Internet Explorer. By using our site, you agree to our collection of information through the use of cookies. To learn more, view our Privacy Policy.

4 thoughts on “Mining Capitalism: The Relationship Between Corporations and Their Critics by Stuart Kirsch

  1. Mining Capitalism: The Relationship Between Corporations and Their Critics by Stuart Kirsch

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *