The oak and the reed moral lesson

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the oak and the reed moral lesson

Stories with Moral Lessons Series by Boots S. Agbayani-Pastor

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Published 08.01.2019

The Oak and the Reeds

On the bank of a river, there stood a tall and strong oak tree near to some reeds. The oak tree was very proud of its strength and size. One day, as a wind started blowing, the oak tree, as usual, said mockingly “Oh!.

The oak and the reeds

There was a beautiful valley cuddled in the mountains. It flourished with many varieties of plants and animals. Amid the valley flowed a stream which twisted throughout. Next to the stream were many flowers, trees and plants which fed from the water the stream provided. There were bees, insects and many other creatures who also lived near the stream. There was one very tall oak tree which sat alone next to the stream on one side. The other side was the home of a large patch of reeds.

An Aesop fable retold in verse by Jeffreys Taylor — Read by Richard. Proofread and audio edited by Jana Elizabeth. Hello this is Richard, and I am here with an ancient story about an oak tree and a reed. Which do you think would survive best in a fierce storm? THE wind was high, the thunder loud ; The lightning flash'd from cloud to cloud ; When an old oak, whose aged form Ere now had witness'd many a storm, Had borne the brunt, and still withstood The wind, the lightning, and the flood, Was torn up from his roots at last, By one tremendous, wintry blast ; Then headlong to the stream descended ; His ancient pride and glory ended. The ample waters soon convey'd The oak-tree from his well-known shade.

There are early Greek versions of this fable and a 5th century Latin version by Avianus. They deal with the contrasting behaviour of the oak, which trusts in its strength to withstand the storm and is blown over, and the reed that 'bends with the wind' and so survives. It so happens that there is an overlap here with the old Chinese proverb 'A tree that is unbending is easily broken'. The saying originally occurred in the religious classic, the Tao Te Ching, with the commentary that 'The hard and strong will fall, the soft and weak will overcome'. Hadrianus Junius tells the fable in a four-line Latin poem and follows it with a lengthy commentary, part of which reads: 'By contrast we see the reed obstinately holding out against the power of cloudy storms, and overcoming the onrush of the skies, its salvation lying in no other protection than a modicum of patience.

In a gale, a tree fell but reeds did not. Obscurity often brings safety.
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ओक के पेड़ और नरकट-Oak and the Reeds - Moral Stories for kids - Fairy Tales in Hindi

It appears in many versions: in some it is with many reeds that the oak converses and in a late rewritten version it disputes with a willow. There are early Greek versions of this fable and a 5th-century Latin version by Avianus. They deal with the contrasting behaviour of the oak, which trusts in its strength to withstand the storm and is blown over, and the reed that 'bends with the wind' and so survives. This in turn gave rise to various proverbs such as 'Better bend than break' [2] and 'A reed before the wind lives on, while mighty oaks do fall', the earliest occurrence of which is in Geoffrey Chaucer 's Troilus and Criseyde II. It so happens that there is an overlap here with the old Chinese proverb 'A tree that is unbending is easily broken'. The saying originally occurred in the religious classic, the Tao Te Ching , with the commentary that 'The hard and strong will fall, the soft and weak will overcome'. A variant Greek version of the fable substituted an olive tree for the oak.

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