Indigenous notions of ownership and libraries archives and museums

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indigenous notions of ownership and libraries archives and museums

Indigenous Notions of Ownership and Libraries, Archives and Museums by Camille Callison

Tangible and intangible forms of indigenous knowledges and cultural expressions are often found in libraries, archives or museums. Often the legal copyright is not held by the indigenous peoples group from which the knowledge or cultural expression originates. Indigenous peoples regard unauthorized use of their cultural expressions as theft and believe that the true expression of that knowledge can only be sustained, transformed, and remain dynamic in its proper cultural context. Readers will begin to understand how to respect and preserve these ways of knowing while appreciating the cultural memory institutions attempts to transfer the knowledges to the next generation.
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Published 01.01.2019

What's the Difference?: Libraries, Archives & Museums (LAMs)

Indigenous Notions of Ownership and Libraries, Archives and Museums

De Gruyter. ProQuest Ebook Central. Total Boox. Total Boox, Cover image. Click to view ebook. Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours.

4 editions of this work

Berlin and Boston: DeGruyter, So it is an indication of the progress Indigenous peoples have made toward cultural self-determination on an international stage to find that IFLA has devoted an entire monograph to ideas of possession, ownership, access, and use of materials of Indigenous heritage. It would have been interesting to learn who initiated "IFLA's request for a book on this topic" p. In the preface, the editors invoke a growing professional consciousness among museums, archives, and libraries in "support of Indigenous ways of knowing" p. The preface also notes that heritage professionals are struggling with questions of Indigenous knowledge and possession and that Indigenous communities are advocating Indigenous models of knowledge for control of their cultural heritage; however, the preface does not explain how this translated into the selection of the authors or the subjects of their articles. The only organizing principle offered is that Indigenous "understanding and preservation of ways of knowing can only truly be upheld with the ultimate aim to transfer the knowledge to the next generation in the proper cultural context" p.

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