Germs biological weapons and americas secret war

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germs biological weapons and americas secret war

Germs: Biological Weapons and Americas Secret War by Judith Miller

In the wake of the anthrax letters following the attacks on the World Trade Center, Americans have begun to grapple with two difficult truths: that there is no terrorist threat more horrifying -- and less understood -- than germ warfare, and that it would take very little to mount a devastating attack on American soil. In Germs, three veteran reporters draw on top sources inside and outside the U.S. government to lay bare Washingtons secret strategies for combating this deadly threat.
Featuring an inside look at how germ warfare has been waged throughout history and what form its future might take (and in whose hands), Germs reads like a gripping detective story told by fascinating key figures: American and Soviet medical specialists who once made germ weapons but now fight their spread, FBI agents who track Islamic radicals, the Iraqis who built Saddam Husseins secret arsenal, spies who travel the world collecting lethal microbes, and scientists who see ominous developments on the horizon. With clear scientific explanations and harrowing insights, Germs is a masterfully written -- and timely -- work of investigative journalism.
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Germs Biological Weapons and America's Secret War

Germs: Biological Weapons and America's Secret War

ISBN 0 0. In the Baghwan Shree cult used Salmonella typhimurium to infect salads in 10 restaurants in the small Oregon town of The Dalles. About a thousand people became ill; were confirmed to have salmonella, making it the largest outbreak in Oregon's history. Two women leaders of the cult who fled to Germany were extradited back to the United States in , tried, and convicted of attempted murder by causing the salmonella outbreak. Both were released after serving four years in a federal prison, but fled again to Europe before state charges could be brought against them. The Baghwan Shree's attack kicks off this well researched and comprehensive book on biowarfare. The book is the result of a three year investigation by Judith Miller, a contributor to the New York Times since , Stephen Engelberg, a reporter on national security for over a decade and now investigations editor for the New York Times , and William Broad, a science writer for the New York Times since

Review of GERMS: Biological Weapons and America’s Secret War

In the wake of the anthrax letters following the attacks on the World Trade Center, Americans have begun to grapple with two difficult truths: that there is no terrorist threat more horrifying -- and less understood -- than germ warfare, and that it would take very little to mount a devastating attack on American soil. In Germs, three veteran reporters draw on top sources inside and outside the U. Featuring an inside look at how germ warfare has been waged throughout history and what form its future might take and in whose hands , Germs reads like a gripping detective story told by fascinating key figures: American and Soviet medical specialists who once made germ weapons but now fight their spread, FBI agents who track Islamic radicals, the Iraqis who built Saddam Hussein's secret arsenal, spies who travel the world collecting lethal microbes, and scientists who see ominous developments on the horizon. With clear scientific explanations and harrowing insights, Germs is a masterfully written -- and timely -- work of investigative journalism. Miller is the author of four books, two 1 bestsellers.

Printer Friendly. The recent incidences of anthrax terrorism in the United States may leave people with the impression that biological agents are new weapons of war. Not so. The history of work on biological weapons during the past 50 years in the United States and abroad is comprehensively described in the book Germs: Biological Weapons and America's Secret War by three reporters for The New York Times. A reader does not have to be a military history buff, conspiracy theorist, or doomsday harbinger to understand that Germs forges a well-documented path from White House corridors to Iraqi war labs to document how bioweapons have become the major security threat of the twenty-first century. By then, six years had passed since the Persian Gulf War and two years since the discovery of Saddam Hussein's biological weapons program.

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