I ve got to see a man about a horse

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i ve got to see a man about a horse

Horse Quotes (173 quotes)

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Published 08.12.2018

Learn English: Daily Easy English Expression 0796: see a man about a horse (dog)

Horse Idioms - What They Mean and How to Use Them

I always heard it as " I've got to see a man about a dog". Not many horses around where I lived I suppose. And as for titbits There was a magazine in England called Titbits, a sort of gossip magazine I think. Loved reading this

Top definition. See a man about a horse unknown. It means to politely excuse yourself from a situation to go to the restroom or buy a drink. It originated from men disappearing to go bet on horse or dog races. See a man about a dog means the same thing.

Last edited on Oct 01 Submitted by Anonymous on Oct 01 I've got to go see a man about a dog. See more words with the same meaning: liquor store, alcohol sales. Last edited on Sep 29

It originated from men disappearing to go bet on horse or dog races. See situation saying, "Excuse me Mr. Quail, I can't stop; I've got to see a man about a dog.
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By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy , Privacy Policy , and our Terms of Service. It only takes a minute to sign up. It seems possibly to be a humorous way to get out of a conversation.

January 15, by Andrew Girardin. I lived 35 years without thinking about horses. The closest I came to a horse was seeing one on TV. Everything I knew about horses was from My Lovely Horse - a song from the comedy show Father Ted which is about two Catholic priests who live on a tiny island :. Then a few years ago I met my girlfriend. She teaches horse riding and she has two horses and a pony.

To see a man about a dog or horse is an English idiom, usually used as a way to apologize for one's imminent departure or absence—generally to euphemistically conceal one's true purpose, such as going to use the toilet or going to buy a drink. The original non-facetious meaning was probably to place or settle a bet on a racing dog. The earliest confirmed publication is the Dion Boucicault play Flying Scud [2] in which a character knowingly breezes past a difficult situation saying, "Excuse me Mr. Quail, I can't stop; I've got to see a man about a dog. During Prohibition in the United States, the phrase was most commonly used in relation to the consumption or purchase of alcoholic beverages.

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